Blog

21
Sep

Greg Izor in San Marcos, CA on 09/28/11

03
Dec

Choosing a CASp Inspector

Not all inspections are created equal. Accessibility surveys have been around since the inception of the Americans with disabilities act of 1990. Although having an accessibility inspection report is helpful, one thing has always been the case, not all accessibility surveys and reports are created equal. Even today, the same considerations need to be made when deciding on a CASp inspection. This article will address a few of those considerations, and help you to make good decisions when considering a CASp inspection. When the ADA of 1990 was signed into law, two things where created; the first being, for the first time in American history the specific equal rights that disabled people had were defined and regulated by the law, the second, was an opportunity for a new profession to emerge. That profession is the Accessibility Inspection Survey Service, which has now evolved into the California Certified Accessibility Specialist program or commonly know as CASp. The main thing to consider when choosing a CASp inspector is "Expertise." Before the CASp program was created it was very difficult to determine who the “experts” were in the field. Many of the professional accessibly inspectors where self ...

11
Dec

Disability Access Continuing Ed – FEB 20th, 09

A notice has recently been sent out from the California Architects Board explaining the new disability access continuing education requirement.  Architects whose license expires between June 30, 09 and November 30, 09 will have to take a 1-hour course in order to renew their license. Architects whose license are up for renewal after Jan 1, 2010 will be required to take 2.5 hours of ADA Continuing Ed. In light of this recent requirement, our company is holding a Disability Access Continuing Education Seminar to satisfy this requirement. Date: February 20th, 2009 Location: Handlery Hotel and Resort, Mission Valley San Diego. Times: 9am-12pm (lunch included) Cost: $135.00 AIA Continuing Education credits are available. For more information please email your request to contact@izorarch.com

11
Dec

Access Compliance Tax Incentives

Two tax incentives are available to businesses to help cover the cost of removing barriers to the disabled. The first is a tax credit that can be used for architectural adaptations, equipment acquisitions, and services such as sign language interpreters. The second is a tax deduction that can be used for architectural or transportation adaptations. A tax credit is subtracted from your tax liability after you calculate your taxes, while a tax deduction is subtracted from your taxable income. Tax Credit The tax credit, established under Section 44 of the Internal Revenue Code (tax form: 8826), was created in 1990 specifically to help small businesses cover ADA-related “eligible access expenditures.” A business that either has annual revenues of $1,000,000 or less; or 30 or fewer full-time workers, may take advantage of this credit. The credit can be used to cover a variety of expenditures, including: Removal of architectural barriers in facilities or vehicles (alterations must comply with applicable accessibility standards) Provision of readers for customers or employees with visual disabilities Provision of sign language interpreters Purchase of adaptive equipment and/or production of accessible formats of printed materials (i.e., Braille, large print, audio tape, computer diskette) Fees for consulting services (under certain circumstances) Note: The credit cannot be used for the costs of new ...

11
Dec

SB 1608

Senate bill 1608 is a bipartisan legislature to promote increased ADA compliance in the state of California, through education and formation of a disability access commission. The purpose of this is to reduce the need for litigation over accessibility issues in the State of California. SB 1608’s sole purpose, is to create a solution to ADA issues in California, that not only protects the civil rights of people with disabilities, but educates businesses of their rights and obligations under access laws. In essence, this bill encourages compliance in a way that reduces exposure to litigation and protects the rights of those who are disabled. For the first time in California history, there will be a requirement for building officials and architects to fulfill continuing education in access compliance. This is to fulfill the need voiced by the disabled community, that there is very little knowledge of access laws in the building and planning process.  The lack of this knowledge hinders the built environment from becoming more accessible. SB 1608 will provide a function that will promote increased general knowledge of accessibility laws among building professionals. In addition to the educational aspect, SB 1608 will ...